Studio Visit: Iede Takahiro

2021年1月25日 - 3月7日
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    As an extension of our current metalwork exhibition Earth, Air, Fire & Water, Onishi Gallery is delighted to share with you an intimate studio visit of metalwork artist, Iede Takahiro. He is renowned for applying bamboo weaving techniques to metalwork, a method that he later coined aya-origane.  Behind the glossy and seemingly perfect exterior of his work are the hundreds and even thousands of hours that the artist spent laboring over each piece. We hope to offer a glimpse into Iede's unique process and further explore the inspirations and origins behind his truly dazzling designs.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Iede's technique was greatly influenced by the brocade looms that his grandfather made parts for when he was a child....

     

     Iede's technique was greatly influenced by the brocade looms that his grandfather made parts for when he was a child. This influence, coupled with ajiro ami —a form of weaving used in Japanese bamboo art, inspired the artist’s unique method of metalworking.

  • In his earlier works like Kaze no homura (Wind's flame) Iede allows the remnants of the weaving process to remain,...

    Iede Takahiro, Kaze no Homura (Wind's Flame), 2014

    In his earlier works like Kaze no homura (Wind's flame) Iede allows the remnants of the weaving process to remain, contrasting greatly from the sleek pieces he is known for today.

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  • First, the artist cuts thin strips of shakudō (gold and copper alloy) and shibuichi (silver and copper alloy) out of a flat sheet of metal that will later be woven together. He then heats and hammers each strip, crimping them along its length and tightly weaving the strips into his desired pattern. Finally, Iede carefully pours pours ginrō, a silver adhesive onto the piece, which melts into the grooves of the metal strips due to its lower melting point.

     

     

  • Forming the shape of the vessel from a flat sheet of metal is an incredibly arduous task, as one wrong...

     

    Forming the shape of the vessel from a flat sheet of metal is an incredibly arduous task, as one wrong hit from the mallet can warp the very intricate pattern.  

     

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     It took the artist over two months to shape Hibiki (pictured below) for this process alone. 

     

     

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    Iede commented, “Because I included the white, undecorated portion of the vessel, Ritsu feels softer and more graceful than some of my previous work.”

     

     

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  • Learn more about Iede takahiro